The English Football Association’s detrimental impact on women’s football

Embed from Getty Images

In light of the English Football Association’s [FA] recent ‘mothers, partners and daughters’ tweet’ regarding the England Women’s football team’s World Cup success, an article from the BFI a week before gave some insight into the FA’s more serious detrimental impact on the women’s game:

By 1921 there were around 150 women’s teams in England, mostly in the North and the Midlands.

Then, just as women’s football looked as if it would be a permanent fixture of English sport, on 5 December the Football Association announced they were to bar women’s matches from all FA run-grounds, effectively removing the opportunity for women to play in front of huge crowds.

The FA stated: “Complaints having been made as to football being played by women, the Council feel impelled to express their strong opinion that the game of football is quite unsuitable for females and ought not to be encouraged.

Quite something for the FA as ‘creators’ of the modern game to encourage the men’s game as the world game we know today hand in hand with discouraging the women’s game—in their own country—to a level it’s not returned to many decades later.

But, very positive moves on the pitch with England exceeding expectations to finish third-placed in the World Cup!

Reference: The forgotten history of women’s football – BFI

Advertisements

One thought on “The English Football Association’s detrimental impact on women’s football

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s